Good Loan News

 

Here are two recently-announced pieces of really good news for home buyers.

 

  • The Colorado Housing and Finance Authority recently raised the income limit for their down payment assistance program to $115,600.  Now more people can get help with a down payment.
  • Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac raised their conforming loan limits so that more people can use a conforming loan and not be forced to use a ‘jumbo’ loan.

Contact us if you would like to hear how these pieces of news could help you.


 

It’s Time to Register for the Market Forecast

Join us for an interactive and insightful look at Colorado real estate.  Our Chief Economist Matthew Gardner will give you all kinds of fun facts and takeaways about where are market has been and where it is going.

 

January 17th at 5:30 pm.  Marriott Fort Collins.

Seating is limited.

Click the blue button below to register.

REGISTER HERE


Posted on December 7, 2018 at 4:34 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Buyers, Fun Facts | Tagged , , ,

HQ3?  

The Front Range may have lost out on Amazon’s HQ2, but that doesn’t mean their company won’t affect our economy.

Denver was in the running for Amazon’s massive new second headquarters that supposedly would bring 50,000 new high-paying jobs and $5 Billion of investment.

In the end Amazon chose to split the headquarters among two East-Coast cities and many in Colorado breathed a sigh of relief.

But they are will continue to be an economic force in our state.

Over the past two years, Amazon has greatly expanded its footprint in Metro Denver, opening up a sorting center in Aurora, fulfillment centers in Aurora and Thornton, a Prime Now center in Denver and a new delivery center in Centennial.

They will soon have 3,000 workers here and that number is expected to grow significantly.


Posted on November 19, 2018 at 9:41 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Fun Facts | Tagged ,

FUNdamentals 

 

In times of change (like now), it’s valuable to look at the fundamentals of our market.

Let’s have some fun with fundamentals…

1.  Our economy is healthy – since 1990, the unemployment rate in Colorado has never been higher than the U.S. unemployment rate.  Ever.  Unemployment in Colorado sits at 2.7% today while the rate across the U.S. is 4.0%.

2.  People keep moving here – since 2005 our population has grown by just over a million people which is roughly 77,000 per year (about the size of Mile High Stadium).

3.  Our real estate outperforms other places – according the Federal Housing Finance Authority, Colorado is the #1 state for home price appreciation since 1990.


Posted on October 26, 2018 at 8:21 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Fun Facts, Gardner Report | Tagged , ,

Country Living at Its Finest!

Country living right between Windsor & Fort Collins at 36667 Pauline Place. This beautiful property has 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, and an over sized laundry/mud room perfect for craft or sewing work table. Also featured is a huge 5 piece master including a jetted tub. Check out the mountain views from the deck! The fenced back yard leads to acreage with mature pear, apple, and plum trees. The grapevines yield sweet table grapes. The unfinished walkout basement has 9 ft. ceilings and plumbing rough-ins. Property is zoned for up to 2 horses. Call for your private showing at 970-460-4370 for more information or click the link below for more details.

http://windermerenoco.com/listing/87341406


Posted on October 25, 2018 at 8:24 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in virtual tours | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A History Lesson

One of the most common questions we hear from clients is “Where do you think interest rates are going?”

Virtually all of the experts we follow put rates above 5% going into next year and some see rates approaching 5.5% by the middle of 2019. What’s certain is that there are economic forces at work that are pushing rates higher.

So, how about a little history lesson? How do today’s 30- year mortgage rates compare to this same date in history going all the way back to 1990?

• Today = 4.85%
• 2017 = 3.94%
• 2015 = 3.82%
• 2010 = 4.27%
• 2005 = 5.98%
• 2000 = 7.84%
• 1995 = 7.75%
• 1990 = 10.22%

While today’s rates feel high only because they are higher than 2017, they are quite a bit lower than at many times in history.


Posted on October 19, 2018 at 3:32 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Buyers, Fun Facts | Tagged , , , ,

What’s Starting?

Here are some interesting stats from our friends at Metro Study who study new home activity along the Front Range.

• New home starts are up 14% compared to last year – this is really good news and is helping to relieve the shortage of housing inventory

• Every product type saw an increase in starts compared to last year (single family, town-home and condominium)

• Condominiums saw the largest increase in starts by a long shot, up 112% over last year- this is excellent news for first time buyers and those looking for product in lower price ranges.


Posted on October 5, 2018 at 10:39 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Buyers, Fun Facts | Tagged , , ,

Beautiful End Unit Condo in Laporte!

This beautiful end unit condo at 3201 W County Road 54G is located in a quiet, scenic location, yet close to Old Town Fort Collins. Vaulted ceilings, and large deck overlooking green belt. Walking distance to Cache La Poudre schools, Laporte Pizza, Swing Station and bike trails. New flooring, washer/ dryer, light fixtures, updated bath. A 2 year high efficiency hot water and radiant floor heat means there is no furnace to maintain! Don’t miss this beautiful condominium in charming Laporte! Call for your private showing at 970-460-4370 for more information or click the link below for more details.

https://www.windermere.com/listing/CO/Laporte/3201-W-County-Road-54G-F-3-80535/85044394


Posted on September 14, 2018 at 3:46 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Laporte Real Estate, virtual tours | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Cost of Waiting

 The Cost of Waiting

It’s true, certain parts of our market are cooling off. We are seeing fewer multiple offers, fewer bidding wars, and fewer inspection concessions.

However, homes that are priced right and in great condition are selling, and in many cases, selling quickly.

As buyers feel the market cool a bit, it may cause them to want to wait. They sometimes feel like it’s a better choice to ‘wait and see what happens.’

The reality is, there is a real cost to waiting given two specific facts.

1. Interest rates will continue to rise
2. Prices will continue to rise

Interest rates are a little more than 0.5% higher than a year ago and experts predict them to be another 0.5% higher by this time next year.

Prices have been appreciating at roughly 10% per year for the last four years. Based on the numbers, we see that appreciation could be 5% per year for the next two years.

So, let’s look at a house priced at $450,000 today. If prices go up “only” 5% for the next 12 months, that home will cost $22,500 more in a year.

And, if rates go up another half percent, the monthly payment will be $206 higher. That’s an 11% increase!

In an environment of rising prices and rising rates, there is a real cost to “wait and see.”


Posted on September 7, 2018 at 6:53 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Buyers, Fun Facts, Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , ,

Everyone’s Talking

Everyone’s Talking

It seems like everyone’s talking about affordability and making an assumption that homes are less affordable than they have ever been.  Not so fast…

Let’s look at home prices relative to the median income needed to purchase the home.

It’s true that home prices have appreciated year-over-year for the last 76 months in a row, largely driven by high demand and low supply.

According to a recent study by Zillow, the percentage of median income necessary to buy a home in today’s market (17.1%) is well below the mark reached in 1985 – 2000 (21%), as well as the mark reached in 2006 (25.4)!

Bottom line, interest rates would have to increase to 6% before buying a home would be less affordable than historical norms.

Source:  Keeping Current Matters


If you want to be totally clear on all the stats, facts and trends in Colorado real estate so that you know what the future value of your home looks like, watch this video.

This is a complimentary service for our clients and friends.

See all the latest facts, stats and trends of the Colorado market from the comfort of your own laptop.

Watch the Windermere Workshop video for a mid-year market update.

WATCH HERE



Posted on August 31, 2018 at 5:59 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Buyers, Fun Facts, Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , ,

Avoiding the Pitfalls of Home Addition Construction

When dissatisfaction with your current home strikes, it can be exciting to launch into a plan for a new addition. A new living room, bedroom, or more can add value to your home while improving your quality of life.

On the other hand, even a modest addition can turn into a major construction project, with architects and contractors to manage, construction workers traipsing through your home, hammers pounding, and sawdust everywhere. And although new additions can be a very good investment, the cost-per-square-foot is typically more than building a new home, and much more than buying a larger existing home.

 

Define your needs

To determine if an addition makes sense for your particular situation, start by defining exactly what it is you want and need. By focusing on core needs, you won’t get carried away with a wish list that can push the project out of reach financially.

If it’s a matter of needing more space, be specific. For example, instead of just jotting down “more kitchen space,” figure out just how much more space is going to make the difference, e.g., “150 square feet of floor space and six additional feet of counter space.”

If the addition will be for aging parents, consult with their doctors or an age-in-place expert to define exactly what they’ll require for living conditions, both now and over the next five to ten years.

 

Types of additions

Bump-out addition—“Bumping out” one or more walls to make a first-floor room slightly larger is something most homeowners think about at one time or another. However, when you consider the work required, and the limited amount of space created, it often figures to be one of your most expensive approaches.

First-floor addition—Adding a whole new room (or rooms) to the first floor of your home is one of the most common ways to add a family room, apartment or sunroom. But this approach can also take away yard space.

Dormer addition—For homes with steep rooflines, adding an upper floor dormer may be all that’s needed to transform an awkward space with limited headroom. The cost is affordable and, when done well, a dormer can also improve the curb-appeal of your house.

Second-story addition—For homes without an upper floor, adding a second story can double the size of the house without reducing surrounding yard space.

 

Garage addition—Building above the garage is ideal for a space that requires more privacy, such as a rentable apartment, a teen’s bedroom, guest bedroom, guest quarters, or a family bonus room.

 

Permits required

You’ll need a building permit to construct an addition—which will require professional blueprints. Your local building department will not only want to make sure that the addition adheres to the latest building codes, but also ensure it isn’t too tall for the neighborhood or positioned too close to the property line. Some building departments will also want to ask your neighbors for their input before giving you the go-ahead.

 

Requirements for a legal apartment

While the idea of having a renter that provides an additional stream of revenue may be enticing, the realities of building and renting a legal add-on apartment can be sobering. Among the things you’ll need to consider:

  • Special permitting—Some communities don’t like the idea of “mother-in-law” units and therefore have regulations against it or zone-approval requirements.
  • Separate utilities—In many cities, you can’t charge a tenant for heat, electricity, and water unless utilities are separated from the rest of the house (and separately controlled by the tenant).
  • ADU Requirements—When building an “accessory dwelling unit” (the formal name for a second dwelling located on a property where a primary residence already exists), building codes often contain special requirements regarding emergency exists, windows, ceiling height, off-street parking spaces, the location of main entrances, the number of bedrooms, and more.

In addition, renters have special rights while landlords have added responsibilities. You’ll need to learn those rights and responsibilities and be prepared to adhere to them.

 

Average costs

The cost to construct an addition depends on a wide variety of factors, such as the quality of materials used, the laborers doing the work, the type of addition and its size, the age of your house and its current condition. For ballpark purposes, however, you can figure on spending about $200 per square foot if your home is located in a more expensive real estate area or about $100 per foot in a lower-priced market.

You might be wondering how much of that money your efforts might return if you were to sell the home a couple years later? The answer to that question depends on the aforementioned details, but the average “recoup” rate for a family room addition is typically more than 80 percent.

 

The bottom line

While you should certainly research the existing-home marketplace before hiring an architect to map out the plans, building an addition onto your current home can be a great way to expand your living quarters, customize your home, and remain in the same neighborhood.


Posted on August 20, 2018 at 10:06 pm
Julie Maxwell | Posted in Real Estate | Tagged , , ,